Wednesday, 17 December 2014

Happy Christmas from us all at PAVO


Your 60 second guide to Trustees Indemnity Insurance


Bite size guidance on changes to charity accounting

January 2015 will see the application of two new charity SORPs, and a series of blogs have been created to help guide you through the various changes that your organisation may need to make.

click here for more information

Safeguarding issues highlights trustee duties

A Charity Commission report has confirmed that two trustees were guilty of mismanagement and misconduct in the administration of their charity, when they failed to adequately deal with safeguarding matters within the organisation.
click here for more information

Trustees and senior staff 'should declare political activity'

Charities should require trustees and senior staff to declare any party political activity undertaken in a personal capacity, draft guidance from the National Council for Voluntary Organisations has said.
click here for more information

Appointment of non-executive members to the NAO Board


  1. The newly appointed non-executive members of the NAO Board are Joanne Shaw, Ray Shostak and Robert Sykes. They will assume their new roles on 1 January 2015.
  2. The National Audit Office (NAO) scrutinises public spending on behalf of Parliament. It is independent of government. It audits the accounts of all central government departments and agencies, as well as a wide range of other public bodies, and reports to Parliament.

Friday, 12 December 2014

Do you need help with Governing documents?

Did you know PAVO can help you with all of these?

  • Constitution (for unincorporated associations)

  • CIO foundation or association constitution (for CIOs) 

  •  memorandum and articles of association (for charitable companies)

  • trust deed or will (for trusts)

Wednesday, 10 December 2014

All about governance !

"It's all about governance." That's the motto of the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisation's (Acevo) governance advice service, reflecting the view that nearly all of the challenges encountered by charities have their roots in governance issues.
From financial crises to personnel problems and risk management to strategy-setting, effective governance is central to steering charities through the everyday challenges that they face.

Did you know 
PAVO provides regular training on Governance issues
Will help you look at your organisation and see if its 'fit for purpose'
Will provide support on all governance issues
contact us on 01597 833191 or

Monday, 8 December 2014

Charity removed from register after trustee spent thousands on holidays and dental treatments

 News from the Charity Commision
A charity trustee has been jailed for 18 months after using charity funds to pay for dental treatment and holidays.
The Charity Commission reported the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Fund to the police after a routine investigation following payments from a commercial clothing company revealed ”serious concerns about the financial management of the charity”. It also found trustees had used the names of relatives without their knowledge.

Wednesday, 3 December 2014

How to transfer charity assets from the Charity Commission

If you need to transfer assets PAVO is here to assist you

Contact us - 01597822191 or helpdesk@pavo.org.uk

Your charity can make grants or gifts to other charities as a way to support its purposes (unless your governing document specifically prevents this). But you may decide to formally transfer all your charity’s assets to another charity if you:
You generally need to get the Charity Commission to approve charity asset transfers.

Asset transfers allowed by governing documents

Usually, a charity has a power to transfer in its governing document, often in the dissolution section. This may say what any assets you transfer can be used for. For example, it may say that they can only be used by a charity with similar purposes.
You must follow any procedure for agreeing and making the transfer that your charity’s governing document specifies.

Asset transfers allowed by law

The Companies Act allows you to transfer corporate property between charitable companies.
The Charities Act allows you to transfer some types of asset if your charity is a CIO, provided you follow the rules below. It also allows you to transfer most types of asset if:
  • your charity’s income is under £10,000, and
  • it’s ‘unincorporated’ (not a charitable company or CIO)

When to change charity structure

If you need to change your Charity Structure PAVO is here to assist you
Contact us - 01597822191 or helpdesk@pavo.org.uk

Your charity’s legal structure sets out what type your charity is. There are four common types of charity structure:
  • charitable incorporated organisation (CIO) – there are 2 structures; association CIO and foundation CIO
  • charitable company (limited by guarantee)
  • unincorporated association
  • trust
Your charity’s legal structure determines:
  • who will run it and whether it will have a wider membership
  • whether it can enter into contracts or employ staff in its own name
  • whether its trustees are personally liable for what it does
You might want to change your charity’s structure because your existing structure doesn’t allow you to do something. For example, trustees of a growing unincorporated charity may decide to change to a corporate charity structure because the charity needs to employ staff.

Monday, 1 December 2014

Social Impact Bonds and news from England

Social Impact Bonds
Social impact bonds (SIBs) are designed to help reform public service delivery. SIBs improve the social outcomes of publicly funded services by making funding conditional on achievi. Investors pay for the project at the start, and then receive payments based on the results achieved by the project.  https://www.gov.uk/social-impact-bonds
The basic model of a Social Impact Bond is that a charity agrees with a public funder that it will try to solve a problem or deliver a very specific service.
 If the charity succeeds in reducing the problem or successfully delivering the service, the public body will make a payment. Otherwise, it pays out nothing.
But the charity doesn’t take the risk. That risk is taken by social investors, who front the cash to deliver the service. They will make a profit if the intervention works. If the intervention fails, they will lose out.
Whether the intervention works or not, with a SIB the delivery organisation is financially secure.

However, currently there is only one Social Impact Bond in Wales, The Capitalise Project is a Department of Work and Pensions Innovation fund project in Wales designed to address cognitive behaviour issues and low achievement in young people (age 14-16) to improve engagement in school and raise achievement level.

Social impact bonds have several advantages but face challenges to success including complexity, scale and difficulty proving their effectiveness, according to a report commissioned by the Big Lottery Fund.
Click link here to read more

Friday, 28 November 2014



Press release

Safeguard 

charity fundraising, 

Charity watchdog 

reminds charities





Reminder comes during Counter-terrorism awareness week.



The Charity Commission, the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, is issuing this alert to charities as regulatory advice under section 15(2) of the Charities Act 2011 – it is particularly relevant for charities which engage in public fundraising.
The commission, the independent regulator of charities is reminding charity trustees to ensure that their fundraising activities are lawful. Trustees need to be vigilant to the potential for abuse or misuse of charitable funds by individuals who may use the good name of a charity to raise or divert funds intended for charitable purposes for private benefit or criminal purposes – including terrorism. The reminder comes during Counter-Terrorism Awareness week (24-30 November) where the Police have highlighted the risk of abuse of charity for terrorist financing.
Although most people who fundraise and support charities have honest intentions, there are some unscrupulous people who will abuse a charity’s name and exploit the trust and confidence the public has in charities.
Michelle Russell, Director of Investigations, Monitoring and Enforcement at the Charity Commission said;
Trustees are ultimately responsible for ensuring that authorised fundraising activities undertaken in the name of their charity comply with the legal and regulatory framework. The public needs to have confidence that the money it donates goes to the intended charity and is legitimately used to help those people in need. It is a serious regulatory issue when any money donated to charity does not go to the intended charity or cause for legitimate work, even more so where the funds could be used for terrorist purposes. We do not want to deter the public from donating to charities and the vital work that they do, however, trustees need to be alert to the risks of abuse and take appropriate and prudent action.
Trustees may not be able to detect and stop all instances of abuse, but there are steps and safeguards that charities can put in place to help detect any suspicious activities, which make it more difficult for them to be abused and help reassure the public that they can donate safely to fundraisers and charities.
  • if you give people who fundraise for you official charity material, such as identity badges, collecting tins and official charity tabards, make sure you collect everything back as soon as you can. You should check that nothing is missing and that collection tins and buckets haven’t been tampered with*.
  • remember that people who fundraise for you by conducting street or house to house collections need a licence to do so.
  • make clear to fundraisers that they need to comply with the fundraising regulations
  • if people fundraise for you, consider providing your volunteers with a basic information pack or leaflet about what they must do and should not do if they are collecting on your behalf
  • if your charity never uses or does not want to encourage donations in the form of cash or street collections, let your donors and supporters know this by making it clear on your website and social media
  • if you are made aware that supporters are collecting on your behalf without a licence, do not ignore it; contact them to let them know this is not permitted and that they need a licence. Under the provisions of the Charities Act 1992 a charity may also apply to court for an injunction to prevent a person from fundraising without its consent
  • if you suspect collectors are collecting illegally report it to the appropriate authorities – such as the Police, Action Fraud and the commission.
*The Code of Fundraising Practice states: To ensure that efficient and effective monitoring of all collections takes place, the issue and return of all materials connected with the collection OUGHT to be recorded. And Arrangements OUGHT to be made for the receipt of the collection proceeds and all used and unused materials connected with it at a specified point authorised by the organiser of the collection.
Ends
PR97/14

Notes to Editors

  1. The Charity Commission is the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales.
  2. Our mission is to be the independent registrar and regulator of charities in England and Wales, acting in the public’s interest, to ensure that:
    • Charities know what they have to do
    • The public know what charities do
    • Charities are held to account

Charity Commission - Latest Fundraising Reminder

The Charity Commission, the independent regulator of charities in England and Wales, is issuing this alert to charities as regulatory advice under section 15(2) of the Charities Act 2011 – it is particularly relevant for charities which engage in public fundraising.
The commission, the independent regulator of charities is reminding charity trustees to ensure that their fundraising activities are lawful. Trustees need to be vigilant to the potential for abuse or misuse of charitable funds by individuals who may use the good name of a charity to raise or divert funds intended for charitable purposes for private benefit or criminal purposes – including terrorism. The reminder comes during Counter-Terrorism Awareness week (24-30 November) where the Police have highlighted the risk of abuse of charity for terrorist financing.
Although most people who fundraise and support charities have honest intentions, there are some unscrupulous people who will abuse a charity’s name and exploit the trust and confidence the public has in charities.
Michelle Russell, Director of Investigations, Monitoring and Enforcement at the Charity Commission said;
Trustees are ultimately responsible for ensuring that authorised fundraising activities undertaken in the name of their charity comply with the legal and regulatory framework. The public needs to have confidence that the money it donates goes to the intended charity and is legitimately used to help those people in need. It is a serious regulatory issue when any money donated to charity does not go to the intended charity or cause for legitimate work, even more so where the funds could be used for terrorist purposes. We do not want to deter the public from donating to charities and the vital work that they do, however, trustees need to be alert to the risks of abuse and take appropriate and prudent action.
Trustees may not be able to detect and stop all instances of abuse, but there are steps and safeguards that charities can put in place to help detect any suspicious activities, which make it more difficult for them to be abused and help reassure the public that they can donate safely to fundraisers and charities.
  • if you give people who fundraise for you official charity material, such as identity badges, collecting tins and official charity tabards, make sure you collect everything back as soon as you can. You should check that nothing is missing and that collection tins and buckets haven’t been tampered with*.
  • remember that people who fundraise for you by conducting street or house to house collections need a licence to do so.
  • make clear to fundraisers that they need to comply with the fundraising regulations
  • if people fundraise for you, consider providing your volunteers with a basic information pack or leaflet about what they must do and should not do if they are collecting on your behalf
  • if your charity never uses or does not want to encourage donations in the form of cash or street collections, let your donors and supporters know this by making it clear on your website and social media
  • if you are made aware that supporters are collecting on your behalf without a licence, do not ignore it; contact them to let them know this is not permitted and that they need a licence. Under the provisions of the Charities Act 1992 a charity may also apply to court for an injunction to prevent a person from fundraising without its consent
  • if you suspect collectors are collecting illegally report it to the appropriate authorities – such as the Police, Action Fraud and the commission.
*The Code of Fundraising Practice states: To ensure that efficient and effective monitoring of all collections takes place, the issue and return of all materials connected with the collection OUGHT to be recorded. And Arrangements OUGHT to be made for the receipt of the collection proceeds and all used and unused materials connected with it at a specified point authorised by the organiser of the collection.

Tuesday, 25 November 2014

Coalfields Regeneration Trust Funding Fayre - 10-12-14 Ystradgynlais

The Coalfields Regeneration Trust (CRT) has arranged a Funding Fair event for the voluntary and community sector on Wednesday 10th December 2pm – 6pm at the Welfare, Ystradgynlais.   There will be various information stalls hosted by the CRT, Game-On and PAVO available to browse. 

There will also be workshop sessions held where a representative of your group could come along and discuss your project idea(s) in more detail with representatives from the CRT, the Community Foundation in Wales, PAVO and the Wales Co-operative Centre.  If you would like to book a workshop session with the funders we are allocating a 30 minute appointment.  If this something you would be interested in attending please contact us on 01443 404455 to book a workshop.

Thursday, 20 November 2014

Good Governance Survey - A Review of Charity Trusteeship in the UK

Nearly half of the c170,000 charities in the UK have vacancies on their boards, and 95% of people are unaware that they can support a charity by becoming a trustee.
 
There are an estimated 820,000 charity trustees in the UK.  They are responsible for ensuring that their charities are well run and working towards their charitable aims.

Good Governance - Event Survey

The City livery company The Clothworkers’ Company is committed to assist in the development of good governance. They have been talking to their partners, Prospectus, NPC and Reach about how we can all work to “raise the bar of governance.” Their programme has been productive and successful.
We are interested in how we can continue to promote good governance via recognition, with the anchor being an awards event. There are many awards over the year recognising achievements. We are keen to acknowledge great governance and to uncover great examples to act as a beacon for others.
Before embarking on this initiative, we would like to establish from people directly involved in the sector whether the concept is valid and sustainable. We anticipate 6 – 8 categories, with awards presented at a free-to-attend event at Clothworkers’ Hall. We would not be selling tables.
We would very much appreciate your support to ensure it is fit for purpose and hope you would be able to spare 5 minutes to answer the following questions.
http://prospect-us.co.uk/about-us/news-events/good-governance-recognition-event/

Charity Commission: latest news

Link to The Charity Commission - Activity on GOV.UK

The Charity Commission would like to reassure charities that their guidance on campaigning stands. Charities can and should feel confident in following CC9 when they plan their campaigning and political activity ahead of the general election.
Click on link for more information

Wednesday, 19 November 2014

Charity Commission: latest news

Link to The Charity Commission - Activity on GOV.UK
Posted: 18 Nov 2014 02:57 AM PST
The commission will appear before a committee of MPs and members of the House of Lords to set out how new proposed powers will help it to tackle abuse and mismanagement in charities more proportionately and effectively.
The commission gives evidence today to the joint committee considering the draft Protection of Charities Bill which gives the commission new powers. The regulator has long argued that there are underlying weaknesses in its enforcement powers and is pleased that the draft Bill includes many of its proposals.
The current draft Bill includes:
  • a power that will ban people with convictions for certain criminal offences - such as terrorism or money laundering - from being a charity trustee. At present, the only convictions that automatically disqualify trustees are those related to dishonesty and deception, such as fraud
  • a power for the commission to disqualify an individual from being a charity trustee where their conduct means they are unfit to act
  • a power for the commission to issue an official warning to trustees of a charity if they breach charity law
  • closing a loophole where currently trustees can resign in order to avoid being removed by the commission for mismanagement and consequently disqualified from being a trustee again. Without this new clause, trustees who resign in this way can go on to be trustees of other charities
The commission has proposed that people who have been disqualified as charity trustees should not be able to hold other significant positions of power and trust in charities, such as a treasurer or finance director. The commission is also seeking the power to prevent a charity from taking action that would be an act of misconduct or a breach of charity law before it happens.
If called upon, the commission will discuss its concerns about the missing proposals with the committee. It will also set out in more detail how it intends to use all of the proposed powers, give examples of their use, and what safeguards will be in place to ensure powers are used proportionately.

William Shawcross, Chairman of the Charity Commission, said:

We are pleased that these new powers have been published in the draft legislation and we welcome the committee’s scrutiny. We know that in order to maintain public trust in charities it is essential that the regulator can take action where abuse and mismanagement is identified. The powers will strengthen our ability to do this and to protect charities. We are accountable to Parliament for our actions and we look forward to appearing before the committee.

Charity Commission: latest news

Link to The Charity Commission - Activity on GOV.UK

Posted: 18 Nov 2014 04:00 AM PST
Updated: Class inquiry report Leeds Islamic Centre added.
In line with charity law, the Charity Commission announces the opening of every formal inquiry into a charity - and reports on its outcome - unless this would:
  • be detrimental to a particular individual or group of individuals, for example a risk to someone’s personal safety
  • contravene or prejudice requirements for confidentiality or commercial sensitivity, or risk National Security
  • cause severe prejudice to the charity and/or its beneficiaries
  • contravene the commission’s duty to use its resources in the most efficient, effective and economic way
  • not be in the public interest
Inquiry reports are available on GOV.UK for up to 2 years after they are first published. They are then archived.
The commission may delay publication of an inquiry report to:
  • avoid prejudicing the work of a law enforcement agency or other regulator
  • give trustees opportunity to complete certain actions within a specified timeframe
  • avoid prejudicing ongoing or pending legal proceedings

Tuesday, 18 November 2014

Powys Dance seeks new Board of Trustees


Powys Dance is one of the leading dance development agencies in Wales and has a first class reputation for its wide-ranging work in the County. The service is revenue funded by the Arts Council of Wales. After 35 years of successful activity as a Council-operated service, Powys Dance will soon launch as an independent organisation with its own board of management. This exciting development will open up a variety of new funding opportunities and allow Powys Dance to operate more flexibly and engage the community more actively in its work.

PAVO and Powys County Council are now at an extremely important stage in the process of working to assist the emerging Charity to recruit a Board of Trustees to shape the new organisation and take it forward. The Board of Trustees will be responsible for driving the vision for the provision of dance services within Powys over the coming years.

If you have the drive, commitment and ambition to get involved in leading an exciting new dance venture, and can offer up to 4 days per year of your time, then please do take the time to read our Dawns Powys Dance Trustee Recruitment Pack ENG in Word or Dawns Powys Dance Trustee Recruitment Pack ENG pdf. Equalities Monitoring Form ENG  Alternatively. contact Claire Sterry PAVO on 01597 822191 or claire.sterry@pavo.org.uk

Monday, 17 November 2014

Planning and Writing Successful Funding Bids (intermediate) - 26/11/2014

Planning and Writing Successful Funding Bids (intermediate)

Date: Wednesday 26th November 2014 – (full day - £20)

Venue: PAVO, Unit 30 Ddole Road Enterprise Park, Llandrindod Wells, Powys LD1 6DF

course
·         Understand the current funding climate in Wales and its impact on funders
·         Review their current approach of developing a bid
·         Apply new tools and techniques to give their bids a winning 'edge'
·         Understand and meet the expectations of funders 

To bookclick here

PAVO OUTREACH 20-11-2014

Do you need some funding support?  Have you got an issue around governance?  Would you like to discuss potential project ideas?  Would your organisation like a health check?

Thursday 20th November 2014             Machynlleth                               10am – 2pm

To make an appointment please contact PAVO on 01597 822191 to book a place

Friday, 14 November 2014

NEW BLOG !

We are back !



Blog for trustees and anyone who sits on a voluntary organisation committee


“To help you to make your organisation the best it can be”


Lots of information and support   click here

We will post regular blogs to keep you informed

A message from the Chair and the Chief Executive of the Charity Commission to charity trustees.
Dear Reader,
Charities exist to create a better society. The range and scope of their work and the variety of people they help is amazing. Whether working locally, nationally or internationally they have a remarkable history of driving social change which is reflected all around us in the world we live in today.
Charities could do none of this without their trustees. You're probably reading this because you have just become a trustee yourself. If so, we welcome you to this role and thank you for taking it on. The commitment and energy you display will make a direct difference to your charity and everyone it helps. You don't have to be a hero or famous to change lives for the better - trusteeship allows you to do just that.
Being a trustee can be hard work and, for most, it's unpaid. The trustees have the ultimate responsibility for running a charity, for its property, finances and the employment of any staff or volunteers.
But being a trustee is also immensely rewarding, providing both expected and unexpected opportunities for personal development. And while you bring your skills and energy to running your charity, you will also find you are gaining new experience and knowledge.
For instance, you will help plan the strategic future of the charity and its work, be involved in developing and managing staff and volunteers and make policy decisions for your charity. You will also ensure it's accountable to its beneficiaries, to the Charity Commission and the public in general.
But you won't be on your own. You'll be joining a team of trustees and becoming part of the 900,000 charity trustees in England and Wales. Effective trustee boards need a range of people with a good mix of skills. The best boards are also diverse, with people who have a real understanding of the needs to be met and others with good financial, business and management experience. The rewards of working with, and learning from, people from different backgrounds and skills will be great.
We hope you will enjoy making a difference to society. And remember that, as well as regulating charities and protecting their reputation, the Charity Commission is here to help you and your fellow trustees.
As you read this guidance, you'll learn much more about your responsibilities and about the many sources of help and support.
Please accept our congratulations on your new role.
Dame Suzi Leather
Chair
Sam Younger
Chief Executive

CC3 - The Essential Trustee: What you need to know


Click here for more information

News from The Civil Society  

ICAEW review warns boards to beware of over-reliance on CEO

Governance | Tania Mason | 13 Nov 2014
  









Failings in charity governance often occur because boards become over-reliant on the chief executive or a single trustee, the ICAEW’s latest review project has found.
And the Charity Commission agrees that this is a common issue that crops up in its casework.  
The ICAEW used its annual charity group conference today to publish the report from its review of strategy development and implementation by charities, derived from conversations with charities that volunteered to take part in the project in return for some free strategic planning advice by qualified accountants who are members of the ICAEW. Some 26 charities with incomes of less than £5m were reviewed.
The review findings included the following:
  • Charities with formal strategies in place are better equipped to withstand economic pressures, but the effectiveness of these processes can be compromised by inadequate skills on the board and poor relationships between trustees and management
  • Most of the larger charities reviewed had strategic plans in place, compared with fewer than half of the smaller ones
  • Many trustees do not have a full appreciation of their role and do not contribute properly to the running of the organisation
  • There is a big risk that boards come to rely too heavily on one dominant individual, and this can lead to severe governance breakdown
  • Few charities considered mergers in their strategies
  • Many trustee boards lacked the financial and general experience to devise strategies
  • A number of charities appeared to suffer from a conflict between the CEO and trustees
  • Few charities linked strategy to risk assessment or used scenario planning techniques to test and challenge their strategies
  • Charities are still not accessing the extensive range of information, advice and guidance which already exists to help them, and
  • Further research is needed into the causes of boards’ shortcomings in the areas of governance and strategy.
The Charity Commission said it could act on some of the recommendations but many were outside its remit and should be taken forward by sector umbrella bodies, including carrying out further research.
http://www.civilsociety.co.uk/governance/news/content/18567/icaew_review_warns_boards_to_beware_of_over-reliance_on_ceo